‘Inside Digital Learning’s’ Best-Read Articles of 2019

Top stories focus on federal policy on digital learning, the business models of textbook publishers -- and institutions' strategies to go big online.

December 18, 2019
 

This is the final issue of “Inside Digital Learning” for 2019, and we thought we'd sum up the year with a few statistics and a look at the articles that most captured our readers' attention.

First, thank you for your readership -- traffic to “Inside Digital Learning” articles grew by 50 percent from 2018 to 2019, to just under two million collective page views. The number of you receiving our weekly newsletter also grew nicely, by about 15 percent. So thanks for that, too.

Our reporters, bloggers and other purveyors of content worked hard to produce content that would engage you -- and the articles below seemed to most hit the mark. The top two articles were oldies but goodies: articles that appeared in 2017 and 2018, respectively, but stayed relevant enough to keep you coming back.

Please enjoy those and the other articles again -- and please come back for more in 2020.

1. 5 Ways to Cheat on Online Exams: We're going to assume this was popular with administrators and professors trying to prevent cheating, rather than …

2. Online Education Ascends: A look at 2017 federal data on online enrollments. We'll see if the article we published last week on comparable 2018 federal data has a similarly long shelf life.

3. Takedown of Online Education: Readers were clearly interested in this harsh (and highly politicized) critique of online education by a former Obama administration official.

4. California Students Caught in the Middle: A potentially dry topic -- a fight in the Golden State over how officials there authorize online programs to operate in the state -- but the impact on millions of students clearly mattered.

5. Rival Publishers Join Forces: What impact will a potential merger of Cengage and McGraw-Hill have on institutions and students? The questions are still ripe.

6. Discussion Boards: Valuable? Overused? Discuss: An article on teaching practices -- and what a great headline!

7. How Many Public Universities Can ‘Go Big’ Online?: The competitive landscape for online learning for state institutions -- and the other colleges that could be affected.

8. Pearson's Next Chapter: Another article about publishers' strategy -- but, as important to most of our readers, about the cost of curricular materials and the adoption of digital.

9. Online, Cheap and Elite: This article, too, is from a previous year -- but Georgia Tech's groundbreaking low-cost master's in computer science continues to fascinate.

10. Google's Growing IT Certificate: Higher education readers remain interested in -- and worried about? -- alternative credentials promoted by major companies such as Google, Microsoft and Amazon.

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