Doug Lederman

Doug Lederman is editor and co-founder of Inside Higher Ed. With Scott Jaschik, he leads the site's editorial operations, overseeing news content, opinion pieces, career advice, blogs and other features. Doug speaks widely about higher education, including on C-Span and National Public Radio and at meetings around the country, and his work has appeared in The New York Times and USA Today, among other publications. Doug was managing editor of The Chronicle of Higher Education from 1999 to 2003. Before that, Doug had worked at The Chronicle since 1986 in a variety of roles, first as an athletics reporter and editor. He has won three National Awards for Education Reporting from the Education Writers Association, including one in 2009 for a series of Inside Higher Ed articles he co-wrote on college rankings. He began his career as a news clerk at The New York Times. He grew up in Shaker Heights, Ohio, and graduated in 1984 from Princeton University. Doug lives with his wife, Kate Scharff, in Bethesda, Md.

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Most Recent Articles

March 17, 2005
Brown's coach discourages wrestlers from joining a fraternity, drawing cries of discrimination.
March 17, 2005
Columbia prizes honor works on antebellum Virginia, race and the Supreme Court, and Southern intellectualism.
March 16, 2005
The student body now elects the editor of The Daily Texan. A pending change troubles some selected in the past.
March 15, 2005
Two-thirds of teams in NCAA men's basketball tourney graduate fewer than 50% of their players, Knight Commission finds.
March 15, 2005
A new Education Department report reveals rapidly rising tuitions, led (proportionally) by public and for-profit colleges.
March 14, 2005
Edward Waters College wins round in U.S. court, temporarily staving off loss of accreditation.
March 14, 2005
A 2003 investigation by the University of Pennsylvania uncovered significant evidence of possible sexual harassment by a prominent medical researcher just six months after another investigation cleared the professor, The Philadelphia Inquirer reported Sunday. Penn officials denied suggestions that the earlier investigation had ignored possible misconduct by Tracy K.
March 11, 2005
Moving expeditiously, the full chamber approves a vocational education bill.
March 11, 2005
Football coaches forced athletes to practice excessively and athletes got $73,000 in books they did not need.
March 11, 2005
It's not often that National Collegiate Athletic Association officials get dragged before Congress and come out smelling like a rose. But that's what happened Thursday at a House hearing on the use of anabolic steroids in sports, and the NCAA has Major League Baseball to thank.Members of two House of Representatives Energy and Commerce subcommittees raked baseball officials over the coals at the hearing, condemning the league repeatedly for doing too little, and too late, to uncover steroid use and to punish those found to have used the muscle-building drugs.

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