Books and Publishing

Books and Publishing
Aug 19, 2020
Can colleges teach students what they need to know in the 21st century? Derek Bok offers an answer.
Hitler's American Model: the United States and the Making of Nazi Race Law, by James Q. Whitman, brings into full view the U.S. Immigration Act of 1924's place in the context of Nazi theory and practice, writes Scott McLemee.
Tom Nichols devotes most of The Death of Expertise to identifying how 21st-century American life blurs the line between fact and opinion, writes Scott McLemee.
A bad abstract won’t by itself cause journal editors to reject a scholarly article, but it does incline them toward an initial negative answer, write Faye Halpern and James Phelan.
Abraham Flexner's The Usefulness of Useless Knowledge highlights how the pursuit of knowledge for its own sake has shown itself to be a powerful force in the world, writes Scott McLemee.
In Light Come Shining: The Transformations of Bob Dylan, Andrew McCarron faces an excess of material about his subject, not to mention more than 50 years of investigation, speculation and exegesis by obsessive fans, writes Scott McLemee.
Scott McLemee reviews Monkeytalk: Inside the Worlds and Minds of Primates, which elucidates the two camps that have formed in the study of how intelligence evolved.
Peter J. Spiro’s At Home in Two Countries explores how globalization has turned dual citizenship from an anomalous and potentially dangerous condition into something almost commonplace, writes Scott McLemee.
Scott McLemee reviews Robert E. Denton Jr.’s scholarship on the American presidency, which highlights how immediately coping with the lack of any guidebook is one of the most urgent demands of the office.
Peer review can sting, write Joya Misra and Jennifer Lundquist, but continued revision is the lifeblood of scholarship.
Rob Brotherton’s Suspicious Minds illuminates how Trump’s affinity for the conspiratorial mind-set forms the bedrock of his very existence as a political figure, writes Scott McLemee.
Can faculty members be politically engaged advocates? New book -- Civic Labors: Scholarly Activism and Working-Class Studies -- argues that they can.
The world's largest scholarly journal, PLOS ONE, is seeing fewer and fewer researchers publish their work in it as the open-access publishing market evolves.

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"The OER Moment" is Inside Higher Ed's new print-on-demand compilation of articles.

This collection of news and opinion articles may be downloaded here, free.

On Tuesday, July 18, Inside Higher Ed's editors presented a free webcast to discuss the themes of the compilation. You may view a recording of the webcast here.

This compendium was made possible in part by the financial support of Cengage.

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