Books and Publishing

Books and Publishing
Dec 04, 2019
Planned pricing changes by academic publisher Cengage have not gone down well with the National Association of College Stores.
Peter Pomerantsev's This Is Not Propaganda: Adventures in the War Against Reality demonstrates that one variety of globalization is compatible with economic protectionism, cultural isolationism and an obsession with national sovereignty, Scott McLemee writes.
Scholar makes argument in favor of race-based research into intelligence, but experts in that subfield say it's an unnecessary plea that doesn't square with scientific realities.
Scott McLemee reviews Daniel Belgrad's The Culture of Feedback: Ecological Thinking in '70s America.
Warnings that Sci-Hub poses a cybersecurity threat to universities have intensified. But few institutions appear to be acting on them.
Scott McLemee explores various scholars' rationales for self-plagiarism.
Legal scholars are increasingly adopting and creating free textbooks in an attempt to increase affordability for students. But are these textbooks considered open educational resources?
Scott McLemee reviews Francis Su's Mathematics for Human Flourishing.
The concept of self-plagiarism is peculiar and in some ways more interesting than ordinary plagiarism, observes Scott McLemee.
Why is brazenly putting one's name on a text that someone else wrote repugnant? Should it be? Scott McLemee explores the issue.
Scott McLemee surveys upcoming university press books that, in anticipation of the coming year's presidential campaigns, focus on the White House or the road to it.
Carnegie Mellon University has signed an open-access deal with Elsevier -- the first of its kind for the publisher in the U.S.
Scott McLemee reviews George Estreich's Fables and Futures: Biotechnology, Disability, and the Stories We Tell Ourselves.

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"The OER Moment" is Inside Higher Ed's new print-on-demand compilation of articles.

This collection of news and opinion articles may be downloaded here, free.

On Tuesday, July 18, Inside Higher Ed's editors presented a free webcast to discuss the themes of the compilation. You may view a recording of the webcast here.

This compendium was made possible in part by the financial support of Cengage.

Archive

December 4, 2019

Planned pricing changes by academic publisher Cengage have not gone down well with the National Association of College Stores.

November 4, 2019

As major textbook publishers grapple with new strategic directions, alternative providers focused on lower-cost materials seize the opportunity to grow their market share.

September 19, 2019

As California's community colleges implement degree pathways with no textbook costs, what -- if anything -- can be gleaned from their data?

September 18, 2019

Publishers’ sales teams can freely visit professors on many campuses. Steven J. Bell asks, shouldn't academic librarians promoting alternatives have easy access to the faculty, too?

July 30, 2019

Concerned about limited purchasing options and potential price increases, students and consumer groups challenge the proposed merger of two major textbook publishers.

June 13, 2019

State University of New York system strikes deal with Lumen Learning to expand and fill gaps in systemwide platform to deliver open educational resources free to students.

May 2, 2019

Cengage and McGraw-Hill Education will combine to create one giant education publisher focused on digital content. Observers aren’t convinced that’s a good thing for students.

April 29, 2019

Analysis commissioned by advocacy group documents how major companies' business strategies could help them lock up research and learning data that colleges and scholars need.

February 13, 2019

To drive professors’ embrace of open educational resources, college leaders should offer incentives -- a share of the financial savings -- to academic departments, teaching centers and libraries, Chuck Staben suggests.

November 14, 2018

Free, accessible curricular materials may have many benefits for students. But the research conducted so far hasn't delivered the required proof yet, Regan Gurung writes.

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