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August 8, 2005
Athletes who go pro or leave for other reasons won't count as failures in measuring progress toward a degreee.

August 8, 2005
Court showdown looms in Kansas over whether public universities own all scholarly work.

August 8, 2005
A former trustee of Compton Community College was arrested last week on charges of defrauding the college of more than $1 million. Ignacio Pena set up a shell company that was paid to teach classes, but never did so, according to the Los Angeles County District Attorney's Office, which also said that Pena charged personal items to college accounts. Pena, who is in jail, was unavailable for comment.

August 8, 2005
NCAA crackdown on Native American team names and icons sends a message but sows confusion and conflict.

August 8, 2005
The only private university to have collective bargaining for graduate students announces a "final" decision to end the practice.

August 5, 2005
The U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission announced on Thursday that it had settled an investigation into "untrue statements and omissions" by Utah's college savings program but filed separate charges accusing its former director of directing more than $500,000 of funds from the plan's participants into secret accounts and transferring $85,000 of those funds to his personal bank accounts.

August 5, 2005
1 in 10 adults reports being in college degree or certificate programs for work-related reasons.

August 5, 2005
College officials, especially at 2-year institutions, fear the effects -- and see Colorado as a cautionary tale.

August 4, 2005
Harvard University announced Wednesday that it would pay more than $26 million to settle a suit brought against the university by federal authorities over the conduct of a university project in Russia that had aimed to help that country's economy. Andrei Shleifer, a Harvard economist who led the project, will pay $2 million in the settlement, The Boston Globe reported.

August 4, 2005
Public universities can reject junk e-mail without violating the First Amendment, federal appeals court rules.

August 4, 2005
Investigation of American University president raises questions about limits and oversight of perks for campus executives.

August 4, 2005
Florida universities see a decline in projections for the fall, but hope to bring numbers up by September.

August 4, 2005
Colorado State University at Pueblo is starting a new focus for a bachelor of science in engineering degree in the fall. The new emphasis is on mechatronics, which combines mechanical and electrical engineering with computers.DeVry University plans to start a new bachelor's degree in game and simulation programming in March.

August 4, 2005
When Florida overhauled its higher education system to shift power from the State Board of Regents to boards of trustees at individual campuses in 2003, it invalidated the employment contract between the regents and the statewide union that represented 10,000 professors, throwing academic labor relations into disarray.

August 3, 2005
Columbia University has announced a plan to spend $15 million to diversify its faculty. The funds will be used for a range of efforts, including experiments with new strategies for search committees, improvements in child care and other programs that help faculty members balance professional and personal responsibilities, and sponsorship of lectures and other programs. Special emphasis will go to recruiting in the sciences.

August 3, 2005
Guns, Germs, and Steel: The Fates of Human Societies has had the kind of impact that most scholarly authors can only dream about for their works. First published by W.W. Norton in 1997, the book won a Pulitzer Prize the next year for its author, Jared Diamond, a professor of geography at the University of California at Los Angeles.

August 3, 2005
Pennsylvania and New Jersey are latest states to investigate for-profit company's campuses.

August 3, 2005
The NIT and NCAA hit the court (the federal kind), as NCAA defends its basketball tournament against monopoly charges.

August 2, 2005
State Department reports sharp rise in number of Chinese seeking visas to study in the United States.

August 2, 2005
President Bush has nominated Bruce Cole for a second four-year term as chairman of the National Endowment for the Humanities. Prior to joining the Bush administration, he was a professor of fine arts and comparative literature at Indiana University.The King's College, an evangelical college in New York City, has won a five-year extension of its accreditation from the New York State Board of Regents.

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