Books and Publishing

Books and Publishing
Cover image of The Flight of a Butterfly or the Path of a Bullet?: Using Technology to Transform Teaching and Learning
Feb 28, 2018
Author discusses new book on how technology is changing K-12 education, and the lessons of schools' experiences for higher education.
The emerging model of openly licensed educational content makes pedagogical as well as financial sense for today’s higher education market, fostering inclusivity and knocking down the wall between writer and reader, writes Brian Jacobs.
Author discusses how college diversity programs can result in students overattributing success to factors like merit and hard work, while ignoring systemic or institutional problems.
Author discusses his new book about why those who major in liberal arts disciplines -- and the humanities in particular -- make great employees.
Claire D. Clark’s The Recovery Revolution traces the history of therapies that help drug users recover from addiction, sometimes with contradictory and controversial practices, Scott McLemee writes.
“The Case for Colonialism” has been revoked -- not over claims of shoddy scholarship or publication irregularities but rather threats to the journal editor. Some call it a disturbing precedent that could make academics less safe.
Bentley University president discusses her new book on preparing students for success.
Nathan Kravis’s On the Couch: A Repressed History of the Analytic Couch From Plato to Freud examines why that piece of furniture ever entered the analytic tradition and how its efficacy and centrality have now come under scrutiny, writes Scott McLemee.
Much of the journal’s editorial board resigns, saying that a controversial article arguing in favor of colonialism failed to pass peer review but was published anyway -- and that the journal’s editor then misrepresented the process.
A prominent journal that already accepted a controversial study about using computers to "read" sexuality based on a photo is further scrutinizing the paper after intense public backlash.
Debora Diniz’s historical and ethnographic study Zika: From the Brazilian Backlands to Global Threat illuminates the emergence of the disease and how global health organizations have dealt -- and not dealt -- with it, writes Scott McLemee.
Northeastern president discusses his new book on how higher education can train students for careers where technology cannot make them redundant.
After a year of constant debate and considerable divisiveness, three texts seek to make the discussion more productive.

Pages

Booklets

"The OER Moment" is Inside Higher Ed's new print-on-demand compilation of articles.

This collection of news and opinion articles may be downloaded here, free.

And you may sign up here for a free webinar on the themes of the booklet on Tuesday, July 18, at 2 p.m. Eastern.

This compendium was made possible in part by the financial support of Cengage.

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